November Mystery Car and Framing Your Shots

November 19, 2018

November Mystery Car - What's in the photo and how to achieve this shot?

 

Hint: It was built in 1959 as part of a series of limited-production roadsters. Fewer than 100 of these were ever built.

 

 

Mystery Car Answer:  

This blast from the past is a 1959 Bocar XP-5, owned and built by Doug Karon, with some help from Bo Vescio. The Bocar was actually a series of limited-production "American Special" roadsters created by Bob Carnes in Lakewood, Colorado. Seven different XP models were built back in the day, with a variety of drivetrains and chassis setups. The XP-5 was noted for its 283ci Chevy V8 engine and Corvette rear suspension. Fewer than 100 were ever built by the factory, and its racing success was spotty, but it turned heads and was featured in a number of automotive enthusiast magazines.

 

Pro Photo Tip:

Notice the way Steve framed these three photos.

 

1) Front Shot: This is a perfect example of what a good front corner shot should look like. The photographer is positioned between the headlights and wheels. This allows him to fill the frame with both the front and side of the vehicle. He is also shooting from a lower position giving the impression that the car is passing right by you. This is a great example of how to frame your first shot.

 

 

2) Interior Shot: I liked this shot because you get a clear understanding of what the subject of this photo is. Sometimes when we try to get too much in our shots nothing stands out. Think about what you are trying to highlight and then make sure you frame it well.

 

I also like the angle of this shot. It almost makes you feel like you are sitting in the passenger seat. 

 

3) Back Shot: In this last shot the framing is excellent, as it makes the car the focal point even despite all the commotion going on around the vehicle. This photo is taken from a higher angle and appears to have just a slight amount of Dutch tilt. Using different angles keeps your photo set from being monotonous and, if well planned, highlights interesting design features.

 

 

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